Curbelo Urges Administration to Remain Committed to Paris Climate Change Agreement

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Washington, D.C., March 14, 2017 | Joanna Rodriguez (202-225-2778) | comments
Yesterday, Representative Carlos Curbelo (FL-26) joined his fellow Climate Solutions Caucus co-chair Representative Ted Deutch (FL-22) and co-chairs of the Safe Climate Caucus, Representatives Alan Lowenthal (CA-47) and Donald Beyer (VA-8), to urge the Administration to remain in the Paris Agreement negotiated under the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UNFCC) in 2015.
 
“Stepping away from the Agreement would mean stepping away from the immense opportunities that these international investments afford American businesses and research institutions,” the members wrote. “On the other hand, fully implementing the climate agreement reached in Paris will create American jobs, boost U.S. competitiveness, and help to transform today’s low-carbon investments into trillions of dollars of clean prosperity.” 
 
“We urge you to continue making the case to the Administration that the United States should not give up its seat at the table by upholding U.S. commitments made to the international community under the Paris Agreement and the UNFCCC framework,” the members added.
 
The full text of the letter is available below and a PDF is available here.
 
March 13, 2017
 
The Honorable Rex W. Tillerson
United States Secretary of State
2201 C Street NW
Washington, D.C. 20520
 
Dear Secretary Tillerson,
 
As co-chairs of the Safe Climate Caucus and the Climate Solutions Caucus in the U.S. House of Representatives, we congratulate you on your confirmation as the 69th United States Secretary of State. 
 
We know that you are well aware of the U.S. State Department’s vital role in international negotiations on climate change. In 2015, the State Department successfully negotiated the Paris Agreement under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The Agreement brought almost 200 nations to the table to make commitments addressing the global threat of climate change. This monumental agreement signaled that the world’s largest carbon polluters, including China and India, are transitioning to a lower-carbon economy.
 
You pointed out in the Senate Foreign Relations Committee confirmation hearing on January 11, 2017 that, “[it’s] important that the U.S. maintains its seat at the table about how to address the threat of climate change, which does require a global response. No one country is going to solve this on its own.” 
 
We agree that our country should not lose its seat at the table.  In addition to reducing the many serious negative effects of climate change a market-led shift to a low-carbon economy due to this Agreement will benefit the American people and many American companies. Whether or not the United States stays in the Paris Agreement, major international investments will be made in clean energy, energy efficiency, and climate resilience. In fact, the International Energy Agency found that $13.5 trillion should be invested in energy efficiency and low-carbon technologies over the next 15 years.
 
Stepping away from the Agreement would mean stepping away from the immense opportunities that these international investments afford American businesses and research institutions. On the other hand, fully implementing the climate agreement reached in Paris will create American jobs, boost U.S. competitiveness, and help to transform today’s low-carbon investments into trillions of dollars of clean prosperity. 
 
We urge you to continue making the case to the Administration that the United States should not give up its seat at the table by upholding U.S. commitments made to the international community under the Paris Agreement and the UNFCCC framework. Please do not hesitate to be in touch with us if we can be of assistance in this effort. 
 
Sincerely,
 
Carlos Curbelo
 
Ted Deutch
 
Alan Lowenthal
 
Donald Beyer
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